Siting Board - Frequently Asked Questions



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BASIC CONCEPTS

Hide details for Q. What is Article 10?Q. What is Article 10?
A. "Article 10" was enacted in 2011 to be a portion of the New York State Public Service Law. It is a general state law that is applicable in all of New York State. Article 10 empowers the New York State Board on Electric Generation Siting and the Environment (Siting Board) to issue Certificates of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need (certificate) authorizing the construction and operation of major electric generating facilities.

Hide details for Q. What is meant by the term "siting"?Q. What is meant by the term "siting"?
A. "Siting" is a process consisting of a series of steps conducted by a regulatory agency in determining whether to allow a facility to be located and operated on a site.

Hide details for Q. What is meant by the term "major"?Q. What is meant by the term "major"?
A. An electric generating facility is deemed to be "major" if it has the capacity to generate 25,000 kilowatts (25 megawatts) or more of electricity. The 25 megawatt threshold is roughly equivalent to the average electric power needs of 30,000 households in New York State.

Hide details for Q. What is meant by the term "electric generating"?Q. What is meant by the term "electric generating"?
A. Conventional electric generation occurs when mechanical energy is converted to electrical energy. Generally, when a coil of wire is mechanically rotated through a magnetic field, an electric charge gets created and is forced to flow through the wire as an electric current. Solar electric generation occurs when rays of sunshine strike a solar panel, they give some of the electrons inside the solar panel more energy, a process that also creates an electric current.

Hide details for Q. What is meant by the term "facility"?Q. What is meant by the term "facility"?
A. A "facility" includes all the components of a power plant located on the site and may also include new interconnecting electric power lines and natural gas fuel pipelines. For example, a natural gas-fired facility would include a natural gas pipeline to bring fuel to the facility; a boiler to create steam; a turbine to be rotated by the steam; an electric generator to be turned by the turbine; a cooling system; exhaust stacks; various buildings to house the components; employee areas; back-up fuel storage tanks; ancillary equipment, parking and storage areas; an electric substation including transformers; and a transmission line to carry the electricity out to the grid. A wind-power facility would include wind turbines on towers with integrated electric generators; electric collection lines; access roads; an electric switchyard and substation including transformers; meteorological towers; and a transmission line to carry the electricity out to the grid.

Hide details for Q. What is meant by the term "certificate"?Q. What is meant by the term "certificate"?
A. A "certificate" is a legal document issued by the Siting Board to an applicant if the Siting Board determines that the applicant's proposal to construct and operate a major electric generating facility satisfies the statutory standards set forth in Article 10 of the Public Service Law. The certificate authorizes the applicant to construct and operate the proposed facility. The certificate must be in the form of a written decision and opinion, must include explicit findings and determinations required by the statute, and must state the reasons of the Siting Board for the action taken.


THE SITING BOARD

Hide details for Q. What is the "Siting Board"?Q. What is the "Siting Board"?

A. The Siting Board is a governmental entity of New York State organized within the New York State Department of Public Service. The Siting Board was established primarily to review applications and to issue or deny certificates authorizing the construction and operation of major electric generating facilities. When the Siting Board is reviewing an original application for a certificate, it consists of five permanent members and two ad hoc public members. The five permanent members of the Siting Board also have additional responsibilities to promulgate regulations for the implementation of Article 10, and they have jurisdiction with respect to the amendment, suspension or revocation of a certificate.

Hide details for Q. Who are the permanent members of the Siting Board?Q. Who are the permanent members of the Siting Board?

A. The five permanent members of the Siting Board are the Chairman of the Department of Public Service who serves as chairperson of the Siting Board; the Commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation; the Commissioner of the Department of Health; the Chairperson of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority; and the Commissioner of Economic Development. The permanent members may designate an alternate to serve instead of the member with respect to all proceedings provided that such designation is in writing and filed with the chairperson.

Hide details for Q. What is meant by the term "ad hoc"?Q. What is meant by the term "ad hoc"?

A. "Ad hoc" is a Latin term meaning "for this special purpose". Two ad hoc members will be appointed for the special purpose of providing a local voice in each proceeding conducted to consider specific individual applications for certificates. Each facility application will have its own associated ad hoc members.

Hide details for Q. Do ad hoc public members receive any compensation for their service on the Siting Board?Q. Do ad hoc public members receive any compensation for their service on the Siting Board?

A. Yes. The ad hoc appointees shall receive the sum of two hundred dollars for each day in which they are actually engaged in the performance of their duties plus actual and necessary expenses incurred by them in the performance of such duties.

Hide details for Q. What are the qualifications to be an ad hoc public member?Q. What are the qualifications to be an ad hoc public member?

A. To be eligible to be an ad hoc public member, the person must:
(a) be eighteen years of age or older,
(b) be a citizen of the United States;
(c) be a resident of New York State;
(d) be a resident of the municipality in which the facility is proposed to be located (if such facility is proposed to be located within the City of New York, the person must also be a resident of the community district in which the facility is proposed to be located);
(e) not hold another state or local office; and
(f) not retain or hold any official relation to, or any securities of an electric utility corporation operating in the state or proposed for operation in the state, any affiliate thereof or any other company, firm, partnership, corporation, association or joint-stock association that may appear before the Siting Board, nor shall the person have been a director, officer or, within the previous ten years, an employee thereof.

Hide details for Q. How are the two ad hoc public members designated to serve on the Siting Board?Q. How are the two ad hoc public members designated to serve on the Siting Board?

A. One is appointed by the President Pro Tem (Majority Leader) of the New York State Senate and one is appointed by the Speaker of the New York State Assembly from a list of candidates submitted to them. The list of candidates is to be submitted within fifteen days of receipt of notification of the pre-application preliminary scoping statement. In the event that the President Pro Tem of the Senate or the Speaker of the Assembly does not appoint one of the candidates within thirty days of receiving the list, the Governor shall appoint the ad hoc member(s) from the list of candidates. In the event that one or both of the ad hoc public members have not been appointed within forty-five days, a majority of persons named to the Siting Board shall constitute a quorum.

Hide details for Q. How is the list of ad hoc public member candidates established?Q. How is the list of ad hoc public member candidates established?

A. There is a different procedure depending on whether the facility is proposed to be located (a) in the City of New York; (b) in a town outside of any villages or in a city other than the City of New York; or (c) in a village.

Hide details for Q. How is the list of candidates established in the City of New York?Q. How is the list of candidates established in the City of New York?

A. If such facility is proposed to be located in the City of New York, the chairperson of the community board, the borough president, and the mayor shall each nominate four candidates for consideration. The list of candidates is to be submitted to the President Pro Tem of the Senate or the Speaker of the Assembly within fifteen days of receipt of notification of the pre-application preliminary scoping statement.

Hide details for Q. How is the list of candidates established in a town outside of any villages or in a city other than the CitQ. How is the list of candidates established in a town outside of any villages or in a city other than the City of New York?

A. If such facility is proposed to be located in a town outside of any villages or in a city other than the City of New York, the chief executive officer representing the municipality shall nominate four candidates and the chief executive officer representing the county shall nominate four candidates for consideration. The list of candidates is to be submitted to the President Pro Tem of the Senate or the Speaker of the Assembly within fifteen days of receipt of notification of the pre-application preliminary scoping statement.

Hide details for Q. How is the list of candidates established in a village?Q. How is the list of candidates established in a village?

A. If such facility is proposed to be located in a village, the chief executive officer representing the town shall nominate four candidates, the chief executive officer representing the county shall nominate four candidates, and the chief executive officer representing the village shall nominate four candidates for consideration. The list of candidates is to be submitted to the President Pro Tem of the Senate or the Speaker of the Assembly within fifteen days of receipt of notification of the pre-application preliminary scoping statement.

Hide details for Q. How is the list of candidates established if the facility is to be built on parcels of land located in moreQ. How is the list of candidates established if the facility is to be built on parcels of land located in more than one municipality?

A. Candidates from each affected municipality will be nominated.

Hide details for Q. What resources are available to assist the Siting Board?Q. What resources are available to assist the Siting Board?

A. The Department of Public Service provides a presiding examiner and whatever legal, technological, scientific, engineering and other services that may be required. The Department of Environmental Conservation provides an associate examiner. The Secretary and the General Counsel to the Public Service Commission serve as Secretary and the General Counsel to the Siting Board.


TYPES OF GENERATING FACILITIES

Hide details for Q. What types of electric generating facilities are likely to be proposed pursuant to the Article 10 process?Q. What types of electric generating facilities are likely to be proposed pursuant to the Article 10 process?

A. Based on recent market trends in New York State, the types of electric generating facilities most likely to be proposed pursuant to the Article 10 process are natural gas-fired facilities and wind-power facilities. But it is possible that other types of generating facilities will be proposed. The Summer 2012 installed generating capacity of power plants in the New York Control Area is 38,902 MWs, type classified as follows: Gas with Oil Back-up 36.9%; Gas 15.7%; Nuclear 13.5%; Hydro 11.0%; Oil 8.5%; Coal 6.1%; Pumped Storage Hydro 3.6%, Wind 3.5%; Refuse 0.7%; Biomass (Wood) 0.1%; Solar 0.1%, and Other 0.2%.

Hide details for Q. Are electric generating facilities to be built by a power authority exempt from the Article 10 process?Q. Are electric generating facilities to be built by a power authority exempt from the Article 10 process?

A. No. There are three power authorities in New York State: the Power Authority of the State of New York (NYPA); the Green Island Power Authority; and the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). The statute expressly provides that all three authorities are subject to the provisions of the Article 10 siting process for major electric generating facilities which they build or cause to be built.

Hide details for Q. Are any electric generating facilities exempt from the Article 10 process?Q. Are any electric generating facilities exempt from the Article 10 process?

A. Yes. The statute provides exemption for:
(a) electric generating facilities with a generating capacity of less than 25 megawatts;
(b) electric generating facilities for which the federal government has exclusive siting jurisdiction;
(c) electric generating facilities for which the federal government has concurrent siting jurisdiction and has exercised such jurisdiction to the exclusion of state regulation;
(d) normal repairs, replacements, modifications and improvements of a major electric generating facility, whenever built, which do not constitute a violation of any Article 10 certificate and which do not result in an increase in capacity of the facility of more than 25 megawatts;
(e) electric generating facilities of 200 megawatts or less constructed on lands dedicated to industrial uses where the electricity generated is used solely for industrial purposes on the premises;
(f) electric generating facilities for which an application was made on or before July 12, 2012 for a license, permit, certificate, consent or approval from any federal, state or local commission, agency, board or regulatory body; and.
(g) electric generating facilities under construction on July 12, 2012.

Hide details for Q. If a facility is exempt from the Article 10 process, can the developer of the facility opt-in to the ArticlQ. If a facility is exempt from the Article 10 process, can the developer of the facility opt-in to the Article 10 process?

A. Yes, if the facility is excluded because of exemptions (d), (e), (f) or (g) set forth above in the answer to the preceding question, the person intending to construct the major electric generating facility may elect to become subject to the provisions of the Article 10 process.


PRE-APPLICATION PROCEDURES - PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

Hide details for Q. What is meant by the term "public involvement"?Q. What is meant by the term "public involvement"?

A. "Public involvement" is the process of enabling the public to participate in decisions that may affect public health, safety and the environment.

Hide details for Q. In what stages of the Article 10 process is it appropriate to conduct public involvement activities?Q. In what stages of the Article 10 process is it appropriate to conduct public involvement activities?

A. Public involvement is intended to be a proactive process that begins during the planning of a preliminary scoping statement before it is filed, and continues throughout the planning, pre-application, certification, compliance, construction, and operation processes.

Hide details for Q. How is public involvement conducted?Q. How is public involvement conducted?

A. At the earliest stage of the Article 10 process, applicants are required to prepare and begin implementing a Public Involvement Program. In addition, to ensure that the public and interested parties are fully assisted and advised in participating in the Article 10 process, an Office of Public Information Coordinator has been created within the New York State Department of Public Service.

Hide details for Q. Is the public required to participate in the applicant's public involvement activities?Q. Is the public required to participate in the applicant's public involvement activities?

A. It is the Siting Board’s policy to encourage public participation in the review of the applicant’s proposal at the earliest opportunity so that public input can be considered.

Hide details for Q. What are the purposes of a Public Involvement Program?Q. What are the purposes of a Public Involvement Program?

A. The purposes of a Public Involvement Plan include: (a) providing for an open exchange of information and ideas between the public and the applicant; (b) providing complete information on the application to the public; (c) providing timely notice to the public of important events; (d) providing meaningful public input to key decisions; (e) fostering the active, early and continuing involvement of interested or affected persons; (f) the solicitation of public comments, ideas, and local expertise; and (g) the identification of circumstances and impacts which may not have been known or anticipated by the applicant or government agencies.

Hide details for Q. What are the elements of a Public Involvement Program plan?Q. What are the elements of a Public Involvement Program plan?

A. The Public Involvement Program plan must include: (a) consultation with the affected agencies and other stakeholders; (b) pre-application activities to encourage stakeholders to participate at the earliest opportunity; (c) activities designed to educate the public as to the specific proposal and the Article 10 review process, including the availability of funding for municipal and local parties; (d) the establishment of a website to disseminate information to the public; (e) notifications; and (f) activities designed to encourage participation by stakeholders in the certification and compliance process. In addition, an applicant is expected to communicate with the public early in the pre-application process through the use of various means such as media coverage, direct mailings, fliers or newsletters. This should be done before any agreements on project stipulations have been made between the applicant and interested parties. In addition, the applicant is expected to hold public meetings, offer presentations to individual groups and organizations, and establish a community presence. Establishing a local office, a toll-free telephone number, Internet website, or a community advisory group are among the actions an applicant may take to establish its presence in the community. An applicant should disseminate information about its proposed project at meetings, in mass mailings and through local media.

Hide details for Q. When does the Public Involvement Program plan have to be prepared?Q. When does the Public Involvement Program plan have to be prepared?

A. Applicants must submit proposed Public Involvement Program plans in writing to the Department of Public Service for review as to their adequacy at least 150 days prior to the submittal of any preliminary scoping statement. For good cause, applicants may request a reduction in the minimum number of days to less than 150.

Hide details for Q. What happens if the Department of Public Service (DPS) finds the Public Involvement Program plan to be inadQ. What happens if the Department of Public Service (DPS) finds the Public Involvement Program plan to be inadequate?

A. DPS has 30 days after the date of the applicant's submittal to make written comments on the adequacy of the Public Involvement Program plan. If deemed inadequate, DPS will make specific written recommendations as to what measures are necessary to make the Public Involvement Program plan adequate. Thereafter, the applicant has 30 days to consider the measures recommended by DPS and, in a final written Public Involvement Program plan filed with the Secretary, shall as to each specific measure either revise the Public Involvement Program plan to incorporate the DPS recommendation, or provide a written explanation as to why the applicant is not incorporating the DPS recommendation.

Hide details for What happens if the applicant refuses to incorporate a DPS recommendation without an adequate explanation, or What happens if the applicant refuses to incorporate a DPS recommendation without an adequate explanation, or has an inadequate Public Involvement Program plan?

A. In such a situation, parties would be free to seek procedural and substantive remedies in the Article 10 process.

Hide details for Q. How do people who do not speak English participate in public involvement?Q. How do people who do not speak English participate in public involvement?

A. Applicants are required to identify significant non-English speaking populations and to address the need for non-English communication and participation in their Public Involvement Program plan.

Hide details for Q. What is the function of the Office of Public Information Coordinator created within the Department of PubliQ. What is the function of the Office of Public Information Coordinator created within the Department of Public Service?

A. The Office of Public Information Coordinator assists the public and interested parties by: (a) implementing measures that assure public participation in matters before the Siting Board; (b) responding to inquiries from the public for information on how to participate; (c) assisting the public in requesting records; (d) ensuring all interested persons are provided with a reasonable opportunity to participate at public meetings; (e) ensuring that all necessary or required documents are available for public access on the Siting Board website; and (f) any other duties as may be prescribed by the Siting Board, after consultation with the Department of Public Service.

Hide details for Q. What is the Department of Public Service?Q. What is the Department of Public Service?

A. The New York State Department of Public Service is one of 20 major departments in New York State government. The Siting Board is a decision-making body organized within the Department of Public Service. The Public Service Commission is another decision-making body organized within the Department of Public Service. The Chairman of the Public Service Commission also serves as chief executive of the Department of Public Service and Chairperson of the Siting Board. The staff of the Department of Public Service represent the public interest in all Siting Board proceedings, under the direction of the Chairperson.

Hide details for Q. How can I contact the Office of Public Information Coordinator?Q. How can I contact the Office of Public Information Coordinator?

A. The Office of Public Information Coordinator can be contacted as follows:
    Contact the Public Information Coordinator:
    James Denn
    NYS Department of Public Service
    3 Empire State Plaza
    Albany, NY 12223
    (518) 474-7080
    Email: james.denn@dps.ny.gov


PRE-APPLICATION PROCEDURES - PRELIMINARY SCOPING STATEMENT

Hide details for Q. What is a Preliminary Scoping Statement?Q. What is a Preliminary Scoping Statement?

A. A preliminary scoping statement is a written document to inform the Siting Board, other public agencies and the public that the applicant is contemplating making an Article 10 application. It is prepared by an applicant after consulting with the public, affected agencies, and other stakeholders. The term "consulting" in this context means providing information to and effective opportunities for input from the public, affected agencies, and other stakeholders, concerning the proposal.

Hide details for Q. When does the Preliminary Scoping Statement have to be filed?Q. When does the Preliminary Scoping Statement have to be filed?

A. The preliminary scoping statement must be filed no less than 90 days before the date on which the applicant files its application for an Article 10 certificate. In addition, at least three days before the preliminary scoping statement is filed, the applicant must publish a public notice and summary of the preliminary scoping statement in local newspapers in the affected area and serve a copy of the notice and summary upon public officials and all persons who requested to receive such notices.

Hide details for Q. What kind of information must be included in a Preliminary Scoping Statement?Q. What kind of information must be included in a Preliminary Scoping Statement?

A. The information that must be included falls into two major categories. The first category is a description of the proposed facility and its environmental setting. Among other things, the information provided must include the description of potential environmental and health impacts resulting from the construction and operation of the proposed facility; measures proposed to minimize environmental impacts; reasonable alternatives to the facility; and the identification of all other state and federal permits, certifications, or other authorizations needed for construction, operation or maintenance of the proposed facility. The second category is a description of the proposed studies or program of studies designed to evaluate potential environmental and health impacts that the applicant intends to include in its application for an Article 10 certificate. The description of the studies must include the extent and quality of information needed for the application to adequately address and evaluate each potentially significant adverse environmental and health impact, including existing and new information where required, and the methodologies and procedures for obtaining the new information. The preliminary scoping statement must also include an identification of any other material issues raised by the public and affected agencies during any consultation and the response of the applicant to those issues.

Hide details for Q. What happens after the Preliminary Scoping Statement is filed?Q. What happens after the Preliminary Scoping Statement is filed?

A. Within 21 days after the filing of the preliminary scoping statement, any person, agency or municipality may submit comments on the preliminary scoping statement by serving such comments on the applicant and filing a copy with the secretary. Within 21 days after the closing of the comment period, the applicant shall prepare a summary of the material comments and its reply thereto, and file and serve its summary of comments and its reply in the same manner as it files and serves the preliminary scoping statement. Thereafter, it is expected that the applicant will work with interested parties to resolve any disagreements they may have about the sufficiency of the planned scope and methodology of studies to be included in the application.


PRE-APPLICATION PROCEDURES - Fund for Municipal & LOCAL PARTIES

Hide details for Q. What is the fund for municipal and local parties?Q. What is the fund for municipal and local parties?

A. Applicants are required at several stages in the Article 10 process to provide funds to be used to defray certain expenses incurred by municipal and local parties when participating in an Article 10 proceeding. These funds are known as "intervenor" funds collected by assessing an "intervenor" fee on the applicant.

Hide details for Q. What is an "intervenor"?Q. What is an "intervenor"?

A. "Intervenor" is the name used to refer to a party other than the applicant or the staff of the reviewing public agency that joins a case or proceeding as a third party for the protection of an interest.

Hide details for Q. What is the amount of the intervenor fee assessed during the pre-application stage?Q. What is the amount of the intervenor fee assessed during the pre-application stage?

A. Applicants submitting a preliminary scoping statement are assessed an intervenor fee equal to $350 for each 1,000 kilowatts (1 megawatt) of generating capacity of the subject facility, but no more than $200,000. For example, for a 100 megawatt facility, the pre-application intervenor fee would be $35,000 (100 x $350).

Hide details for Q. What happens if after the pre-application intervenor fees have been used up, the applicant amends its preliQ. What happens if after the pre-application intervenor fees have been used up, the applicant amends its preliminary scoping statement and more review is required?

A. If the pre-application preliminary scoping statement is substantially modified or revised, the Siting Board may require an additional pre-application intervenor fee in an amount not to exceed $25,000.

Hide details for Q. How does a qualified intervenor make a request for intervenor funds?Q. How does a qualified intervenor make a request for intervenor funds?

A. A notice of availability of the funds will be issued providing a schedule and related information describing how interested members of the public may apply for pre-application funds. Requests for pre-application funds shall be submitted to the presiding examiner not later than 30 days after the issuance of the notice of availability by filing the request with the Secretary and submitting a copy to the presiding examiner and to the other parties to the proceeding. An initial pre-application meeting to consider fund requests shall be convened within no less than 45 days but no more than 60 days of the filing of a preliminary scoping statement. At any pre-application meeting that may be held to consider fund requests, intervenors should be prepared to discuss their funding applications and the award of funds. Intervenors are encouraged to consider the consolidation of requests with similar funding proposals of other intervenors.

Hide details for Q. When are pre-application intervenor funds awarded?Q. When are pre-application intervenor funds awarded?

A. The presiding examiner will provide for an expedited pre-application funding disbursement schedule to assure early and meaningful public involvement. Following receipt of initial requests for pre-application funds, the presiding examiner shall expeditiously make an initial award of pre-application funds. Subject to the availability of funds, the presiding examiner may fix additional dates for submission of fund requests. Thereafter the presiding examiner may make additional awards of pre-application funds, in relation to the potential for such awards to make an effective contribution to review of the preliminary scoping statement.

Hide details for Q. Who is eligible for intervenor funds?Q. Who is eligible for intervenor funds?

A. All municipal and local parties are eligible. The presiding examiner shall reserve at least 50% of the pre-application funds for potential awards to municipalities.

Hide details for Q. What can pre-application intervenor funds be used for?Q. What can pre-application intervenor funds be used for?

A. The pre-application intervenor funds awarded can be used to defray pre-application expenses incurred by municipal and local parties for expert witnesses, consultants, administrative costs (document preparation and duplications costs) and legal fees. No intervenor funds may be used to pay for judicial review or litigation costs.

Hide details for Q. On what basis will the funds be awarded?Q. On what basis will the funds be awarded?

A. The presiding examiner will award funds on an equitable basis to participants during the pre-application phase to be used to make an effective contribution to review of the preliminary scoping statement, and thereby provide early and effective public involvement.


PRE-APPLICATION PROCEDURES - STIPULATIONS

Hide details for Q. What are stipulations?Q. What are stipulations?

A. "Stipulations" are agreements among parties that concern matters before the Siting Board and are designed to simplify or shorten litigation and save costs. Any parties to the proceeding can enter into a stipulation setting forth an agreement on any aspect of the preliminary scoping statement and the scope of studies or program of studies to be conducted. It is often in the interests of applicants and other parties to agree in advance to the content and methodology for conducting studies that will be submitted as part of the application.

Hide details for Q. How is the stipulations process initiated?Q. How is the stipulations process initiated?

A. So that all parties will have an opportunity to participate, the applicant may not commence consultations or seek agreements on proposed stipulations until the pre-application intervenor funds have been allocated by the presiding examiner. Within sixty days of the filing of a preliminary scoping statement, the presiding examiner will convene a meeting of interested parties in order to initiate the stipulation process. The presiding examiner will also oversee the pre-application process and mediate any issue relating to any aspect of the preliminary scoping statement and the methodology and scope of any such studies or programs of study in order to attempt to resolve any questions that may arise.

Hide details for Q. Do other parties and the public get an opportunity to participate in the stipulations process?Q. Do other parties and the public get an opportunity to participate in the stipulations process?

A. Yes. Before a stipulation may be executed, notice of the proposed stipulation must be provided and the public and other parties must be afforded a reasonable opportunity to submit comments on the proposed stipulation before it is executed by the interested parties.

Hide details for Q. What happens if a party does not agree that a stipulation entered into between the applicant and another paQ. What happens if a party does not agree that a stipulation entered into between the applicant and another party is adequate?

A. No party that is not a signatory to the stipulation is barred from timely raising objections to any aspect of the preliminary scoping statement and the methodology and scope of any stipulated studies or program of studies in any such stipulation. A party that is a signatory to the stipulation may not object to any aspect of the preliminary scoping statement and the methodology and scope of any stipulated studies or program of studies covered in any such stipulation, unless the applicant fails to comply with the stipulation.



APPLICATION PROCEDURES - SUBMISSION OF AN APPLICATION

Hide details for Q. What happens when an Article 10 application is submitted?Q. What happens when an Article 10 application is submitted?

A. Within sixty days of receipt, the Chairperson of the Siting Board determines whether the documents submitted comply with the requirements of the law, regulations and stipulations. The Department of Environmental Conservation also advises the Siting Board within the sixty day period whether the documents submitted contain sufficient information.

Hide details for Q. What happens if the documents submitted are insufficient to comply with the requirements of the law, regulaQ. What happens if the documents submitted are insufficient to comply with the requirements of the law, regulations and stipulations?

A. If the documents submitted are insufficient to comply with the requirements of the law, regulations and stipulations, the Chairperson of the Siting Board will issue a letter to the applicant advising of the deficiencies that must be corrected before the documents can be deemed a complying application. The Chairperson of the Siting Board may also require the filing of any additional information needed to supplement an application before or during the hearings.

Hide details for Q. What happens if the documents submitted are sufficient to comply with the requirements of the law, regulatiQ. What happens if the documents submitted are sufficient to comply with the requirements of the law, regulations and stipulations?

A. If the documents submitted are sufficient to comply with the requirements of the law, regulations and stipulations, the Chairperson of the Siting Board will issue a letter to the applicant advising that the documents submitted constitute a complying application. The Chairperson will also fix the date for the commencement of a public hearing and the Department of Environmental Conservation will initiate its review pursuant to federally delegated or approved environmental permitting authority or air and water permit applications. Within a reasonable time, the presiding examiner will hold a prehearing conference to expedite the orderly conduct and completion of the hearing, to specify the issues, to obtain stipulations as to matters not disputed, and to deal with other matters deemed appropriate. The presiding examiner will then issue an order identifying the issues to be addressed by the parties. Later in the proceeding there may also be a consideration of additional issues which warrant consideration in order to develop an adequate record.


APPLICATION PROCEDURES - DESIGNATION OF PARTIES

Hide details for Q. Who are the parties to an Article 10 proceeding?Q. Who are the parties to an Article 10 proceeding?

A. There are three kinds of parties: (a) automatic statutory parties; (b) parties that have a right to be a party merely by giving notice; and (c) parties that may be permitted to join.

Hide details for Q. Who are the automatic statutory parties to an Article 10 proceeding?Q. Who are the automatic statutory parties to an Article 10 proceeding?

A. The applicant, staff of the Department of Public Service, the Department of Environmental Conservation, the Department of Economic Development, the Department of Health, the Department of Agriculture and Markets, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, the Department of State, the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, and in certain instances, the Adirondack Park Agency.

Hide details for Q. Who are the parties that have a right to be a party to an Article 10 proceeding merely by giving notice?Q. Who are the parties that have a right to be a party to an Article 10 proceeding merely by giving notice?

A. Provided they file with the Siting Board a notice of intent to be a party, within 45 days after the date given in the published notice as the date for the filing of the application, the following parties have a right to be a party to an Article 10 proceeding merely by giving the required notice: (a) the affected municipality; (b) any individual resident of an affected municipality; (c) any non-profit corporation or association, formed in whole or in part to promote conservation or natural beauty, to protect the environment, personal health or other biological values, to preserve historical sites, to promote consumer interests, to represent commercial and industrial groups or to promote the orderly development of any area in which the facility is to be located; and (d) any other municipality or resident of such municipality located within a five mile radius of such proposed facility (their notice of intent must include an explanation of the potential environmental effects on such municipality or person). In addition, the presiding officer may for good cause shown permit a municipality or other person to become a party and to participate in all subsequent stages of the proceeding.

Hide details for Q. Who are the parties that may be permitted to join?Q. Who are the parties that may be permitted to join?

A. Such other persons or entities as the Siting Board may at any time deem appropriate, who may participate in all subsequent stages of the proceeding.

Hide details for Q. Where does a party file a notice of intent to be a party?Q. Where does a party file a notice of intent to be a party?

A. A notice of intent to be a party must be filed with the Secretary to the Siting Board.


APPLICATION PROCEDURES - Fund for Municipal & LOCAL PARTIES

Hide details for Q. What is the amount of the intervenor fee assessed when an application is filed?Q. What is the amount of the intervenor fee assessed when an application is filed?

A. Applicants are assessed an intervenor fee equal to $1,000 for each 1,000 kilowatts (1 megawatt) of generating capacity of the subject facility, but no more than $400,000. For example, for a 100 megawatt facility, the application phase intervenor fee would be $100,000 (100 x $1000). In addition, for facilities that will require storage or disposal of fuel waste byproduct, an additional intervenor fee will be assessed at the application phase of $500.00 for each 1,000 kilowatts (1 megawatt) of capacity, but no more than an additional $50,000.00.

Hide details for Q.	What happens if after the application phase intervenor fees have been used up, the applicant amends its appQ. What happens if after the application phase intervenor fees have been used up, the applicant amends its application and more review is required?

A. If the application amendment is deemed a revision requiring substantial additional scrutiny, the applicant will be assessed an additional intervenor fee equal to $1,000 for each 1,000 kilowatts of capacity of the proposed project, as amended, but no more than $75,000.00. The presiding examiner may increase the level of the additional intervenor fee up to the maximum level of $75,000 if the presiding examiner finds circumstances require a higher level of intervenor funding in order to ensure an adequate record.

Hide details for Q. How does a qualified intervenor make a request for intervenor funds?Q. How does a qualified intervenor make a request for intervenor funds?

A. A notice of availability of the funds will be issued providing a schedule and related information. The notice will describe how municipal and local parties may apply for intervenor funds. Requests must be submitted to the presiding examiner within 30 days after the issuance of the notice by filing the request with the Secretary and submitting a copy to the presiding examiner and to the other parties to the proceeding. At any pre-hearing conference that may be held to consider fund requests, the parties should be prepared to discuss their funding applications and the award of funds. Parties are encouraged to consider consolidating their requests with similar funding proposals made by other parties.

Hide details for Q. Who is eligible for intervenor funds?Q. Who is eligible for intervenor funds?

A. All municipal and local parties to the proceeding are eligible for application phase intervenor funds. The presiding examiner shall reserve at least 50% of the application phase funds for potential awards to municipalities.

Hide details for Q. What can application phase intervenor funds be used for?Q. What can application phase intervenor funds be used for?

A. The intervenor funds awarded can be used to defray expenses incurred by municipal and local parties for expert witnesses, consultants, administrative costs (document preparation and duplications costs) and legal fees. No intervenor funds may be used to pay for judicial review or litigation costs.

Hide details for Q. On what basis will the funds be awarded?Q. On what basis will the funds be awarded?

A. The presiding examiner will award funds on an equitable basis to municipal and local parties who will use them to contribute to a complete record leading to an informed decision as to the appropriateness of the site and the facility and will facilitate broad participation in the proceeding.


HEARING PROCEDURES - CONDUCT OF THE HEARING

Hide details for Q. Who conducts the hearings?Q. Who conducts the hearings?

A. The hearings will be conducted by a presiding examiner designated by the Department of Public Service. An associate examiner shall be designated by the Department of Environmental Conservation. The associate examiner will assist the presiding examiner in inquiring into and calling for testimony concerning relevant and material matters, and the conclusions and recommendations of the associate examiner will be incorporated in the recommended decision of the presiding examiner.

Hide details for Q. What kinds of hearings will be held?Q. What kinds of hearings will be held?

A. It is expected that both public statement hearings and trial-type evidentiary hearings will be held. In addition, persons are permitted to make a limited appearance.

Hide details for Q. What are "public statement" hearings?Q. What are "public statement" hearings?

A. Public statement hearings are designed to obtain input from the general public. The format is designed for the taking of unsworn oral statements, although written statements ordinarily may also be submitted. Parties to the proceeding are not permitted to cross examine the persons making such statements.

Hide details for Q. What is a "limited appearance"?Q. What is a "limited appearance"?

A. Any person may make a limited appearance in the proceeding by filing a statement of his or her intent to limit his or her appearance in writing at any time prior to the commencement of the hearing. All papers and matters filed by a person making a limited appearance shall become part of the record. No person making a limited appearance shall be a party or shall have the right to present testimony or cross-examine witnesses or parties.

Hide details for Q. What are "trial-type evidentiary" hearings?Q. What are "trial-type evidentiary" hearings?

A. Trial-type evidentiary hearings are designed to obtain sworn testimony from witnesses (usually expert witnesses) that are subject to cross examination by the parties to the proceeding. The format is designed like a trial and it is recommended that the participants be assisted by legal counsel, although the assistance of legal counsel is not mandatory. The usual practice is for written direct and rebuttal testimony and discovery to be circulated to the parties in advance so that the hearings can focus on the cross examination of witnesses.

Hide details for Q. What is "discovery"?Q. What is "discovery"?

A. "Discovery" is a pre-trial process used by parties to obtain facts and information about the case from other parties. The most common discovery device is the written interrogatory, but oral depositions and other devices are also available. Any party to a proceeding is subject to the discovery process.

Hide details for Q. If the Siting Board does not personally conduct the hearings, how does it become informed of the proceedingQ. If the Siting Board does not personally conduct the hearings, how does it become informed of the proceedings?

A. A written transcript record is made of the hearings and of all testimony taken and the cross-examinations thereon. In addition, the presiding examiner will provide a summary of the proceedings in a recommended decision that will be presented to the Siting Board. The parties will also present legal briefs to the Siting Board with citations to the portions of the record they deem relevant to their positions.


SITING BOARD DECISIONS - TIMING OF THE DECISION

Hide details for Q. Is there a deadline by which the Siting Board must make a final decision on an Article 10 application?Q. Is there a deadline by which the Siting Board must make a final decision on an Article 10 application?

A. Yes. All proceedings on an application including a final decision by the Siting Board must be completed within 12 months from the date of a determination by the Chairperson that an application complies, except that the Siting Board may extend the deadline in extraordinary circumstances by no more than 6 months in order to give consideration to specific issues necessary to develop an adequate record. The board must render a final decision on the application by the aforementioned deadlines unless the deadlines are waived by the applicant.

Hide details for Q. What happens to the deadline if the application is amended during the Article 10 proceeding?Q. What happens to the deadline if the application is amended during the Article 10 proceeding?

A. If during the proceeding there is a material and substantial amendment to the application, the deadlines may be extended by no more than 6 months to consider such amendment, unless the deadline is waived by the applicant.

Hide details for Q. Are there any other exceptions to the deadlines described above?Q. Are there any other exceptions to the deadlines described above?

A. Yes, but only in an unusual circumstance. If the proceeding is on certain qualifying applications by an owner of an existing major electric generating facility to modify that facility or site a new major electric generating facility adjacent or contiguous to the existing facility, the deadlines are different such that the final decision by the Siting Board must be completed within 6 months, the extension permitted in extraordinary circumstances is 3 months, and the extension permitted to consider a material and substantial amendment to the application is 3 months, unless the deadlines are waived by the applicant.


SITING BOARD DECISIONS - SUBSTANCE OF THE DECISION

Hide details for Q. What options does the Siting Board have in making a decision on an Article 10 application?Q. What options does the Siting Board have in making a decision on an Article 10 application?

A. The Siting Board can grant a certificate in the manner requested by the applicant, it can grant a certificate subject to modifications and or conditions, or it may deny the application. In rendering a decision on an application for a certificate, the Siting Board must issue a written opinion stating its reasons for the action taken.

Hide details for Q. What substantive matters must be addressed in any Siting Board decision to grant an Article 10 certificate?Q. What substantive matters must be addressed in any Siting Board decision to grant an Article 10 certificate?

A. The Siting Board is required to make certain statutory findings and determinations, and the required determinations can only be made after considering certain required factors.

Hide details for Q. What are the required statutory findings that must be made by the Siting Board?Q. What are the required statutory findings that must be made by the Siting Board?

A. The Siting Board must make explicit findings regarding the nature of the probable environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the facility, including the cumulative environmental impacts of the construction and operation of related facilities such as electric lines, gas lines, water supply lines, waste water or other sewage treatment facilities, communications and relay facilities, access roads, rail facilities, or steam lines, including impacts on: (a) ecology, air, ground and surface water, wildlife, and habitat;
(b) public health and safety; (c) cultural, historic, and recreational resources, including aesthetics and scenic values; and (d) transportation, communication, utilities and other infrastructure. Such findings shall include the cumulative impact of emissions on the local community including whether the construction and operation of the facility results in a significant and adverse disproportionate environmental impact, in accordance with regulations promulgated by the Department of Environmental Conservation regarding environmental justice issues.

Hide details for Q. What are the required statutory determinations that must be made by the Siting Board?Q. What are the required statutory determinations that must be made by the Siting Board?

A. The Siting Board must make explicit determinations that: (a) the facility is a beneficial addition to or substitution for the electric generation capacity of the state; (b) the construction and operation of the facility will serve the public interest; (c) the adverse environmental effects of the construction and operation of the facility will be minimized or avoided to the maximum extent practicable; (d) if the board finds that the facility results in or contributes to a significant and adverse disproportionate environmental impact in the community in which the facility would be located, the applicant will avoid, offset or minimize the impacts caused by the facility upon the local community for the duration that the certificate is issued to the maximum extent practicable using verifiable measures; (e) the facility is designed to operate in compliance with applicable state and local laws and regulations issued thereunder concerning, among other matters, the environment, public health and safety, all of which shall be binding upon the applicant, except that the Siting Board may elect not to apply, in whole or in part, any local ordinance, law, resolution or other action or any regulation issued thereunder or any local standard or requirement, including, but not limited to, those relating to the interconnection to and use of water, electric, sewer, telecommunication, fuel and steam lines in public rights of way, which would be otherwise applicable if it finds that, as applied to the proposed facility, such is unreasonably burdensome in view of the existing technology or the needs of or costs to ratepayers whether located inside or outside of such municipality. The Siting Board shall provide the municipality an opportunity to present evidence in support of such ordinance, law, resolution, regulation or other local action issued thereunder.

Hide details for Q. What are the required statutory factors that must be considered by the Siting Board in making the required Q. What are the required statutory factors that must be considered by the Siting Board in making the required determinations?

A. The Siting Board must consider: (a) the state of available technology; (b) the nature and economics of reasonable alternatives; (c) environmental impacts found pursuant to subdivision two of this section; (d) the impact of construction and operation of related facilities, such as electric lines, gas lines, water supply lines, waste water or other sewage treatment facilities, communications and relay facilities, access roads, rail facilities, or steam lines; (e) the consistency of the construction and operation of the facility with the energy policies and long-range energy planning objectives and strategies contained in the most recent state energy plan; (f) the impact on community character and whether the facility would affect communities that are disproportionately impacted by cumulative levels of pollutants; and (g) such additional social, economic, visual or other aesthetic, environmental and other considerations deemed pertinent by the Siting Board.


COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT

Hide details for Q. Who is in charge of compliance and enforcement matters regarding a Certificate that has been issued?Q. Who is in charge of compliance and enforcement matters regarding a Certificate that has been issued?

A. Following any rehearing and any judicial review of the decision, the Siting Board's jurisdiction over an application shall cease, provided, however, that the permanent board shall retain jurisdiction with respect to the amendment, suspension or revocation of a certificate. The Department of Public Service or the Public Service Commission shall monitor, enforce and administer compliance with any terms and conditions set forth in the Siting Board's order granting a certificate.



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